Identity Theft Prevention Tip

Identity theft can occur at any moment and any of us can become a victim. There are some precautions you can take for identity theft prevention, and they are easy to do in comparison to the problems you'll experience if you become a victim of identity theft.

One way to prevent identity theft is to establish specific routines that you know will provide you with a safe defense against the crime. As an example, there are precautions that I always take when I go to refuel my car. I was happy to find this video because it demonstrates the same identity theft precautions I exercise each time I go to refuel my car. Sometimes I feel my precautions are over-zealous, but after watching an actual crime on this video it confirms I've been exercising a good line of defense against identity theft.

In less than five minutes, this video will increase your awareness for an effective identity theft prevention tactic that could save you big dollars, and a significant amount of grief. It's well worth a few minutes of your time.

Humorous Pet Food Blooper

Years ago in the 1970's one of my sisters gave me a little Peanuts Cook Book. The other day I recalled one of the recipe's in the Peanuts Cook Book, and how funny it struck me, as it seems to be a word blooper!

We've all seen or read bloopers and have experienced a good laugh from them. I consider this to be a blooper in regards to the bad choice of words used in the recipe, but, maybe it's just me. The recipe is for "Snoopy's Steak Tarter", which is a dog food recipe.

Let's take a closer look below at the main ingredient for the recipe. Then ask yourself, "Whose pet was it?
Should we be concerned?
Perhaps the author of the cookbook had economics in mind to create a low-cost pet food by using resources from their neighborhood? Just to play it safe, beware of any of your neighbors that may have this recipe. They may be looking for pet meat! Be sure to keep Fido locked up.

Telecommuting and Casual Friday

Although it isn't Friday, I read an interesting article about casual Friday, which brought some things to mind in regards to telecommuting. Although casual Friday can be fun at the work place, with telecommuting it seems every day is a casual Friday! In fact it seems many days for telecommuters is "Jammie Day", which I'm not too fond of. It gets boring enough as it is wearing just casual clothes every day, let alone pajamas.

If you telecommute I think it's important to still look your best to feel your best. For me, staying in my jammies all day makes me feel frumpy and just all around bummed out. Whenever I telecommute in my pajamas, I can attest that I don't feel my best. I guess the reason it's like that for me is because when I grew up staying in your pajamas all day meant you weren't feeling well or we were home from school due to illness. Perhaps there's an unhealthy psychological message for some of us from wearing pajamas as we telecommute?

When I speak to someone over the phone I also feel odd wearing my pajamas. Call me odd if you wish, but even though the person I speak to can't see me, I still feel strange.

One other thought I wanted to share is for those of you who have a tendency toward depression. I find that if I dress as I would if I worked elsewhere, than overall I feel much better about myself, and the day in general, but if I remain in my pajamas until late in the day I feel odd. At the very least dressing as I would for casual Friday I feel much more optimistic about my day, and my life in general.

I'm not attempting to judge those of you who prefer to wear your pajamas while telecommuting, but if you are not feeling good about yourself you may want to change the habit and start your day well groomed. I know it affects me psychologically, so perhaps it does you as well. Every day can still be like a casual Friday, but you may find that it makes you feel better to groom yourself at least as good as a casual Friday at the office. If you've telecommuted in your pajamas and don't feel good about your work life, try breaking the habit and you'll perhaps be amazed at how much better you feel.

This post was inspired by a Link & Blog Challenge!

Work at Home Training Materials Scam

While reading about yet another work at home scam, I realized you may not be aware of what I refer to as the "work at home training materials scam".

How the Work at Home Training Material Scam Works

First off, understand that a legitimate employer will not request you to pay them for training materials to do their work! Many however, still fall victim to the scams that are nothing more then asking you to pay for training materials so they can walk away after you've sent the funds through PayPal.

What are the training materials that you end up with, and what do they train you to do?

For the work at home training materials scam, what the person generally ends up receiving for their training materials is information on how to then turn around and scam other people out of their money for them to do the same thing, but only this time to buy the training materials from you. The training materials is nothing more than some computer documents emailed to you.

How do you recognize the scam?

It's quite easy to recognize the work at home training materials scam. Generally one of the first indicators is the fact that they are willing to hire you without requiring any experience for the position, and they are willing to hire you without conducting an interview.

Next, the obvious then comes to light when they ask you to pay for the training materials to begin your work at home telecommuting position. Play it safe, and avoid all of the work at home training materials scams, and never send anyone money for training materials. The work at home training materials scam is one scam you can easily avoid.

Work at Home Resource

Looking for a work at home telecommuting position? If so, you've perhaps already discovered that there are many work at home scams claiming to be the "job" and opportunity for you. With the vast majority work at home offers being scams, you must do a significant amount of homework to not fall prey to a work at home scam.

Utilizing a variety of reliable sources for information is also helpful. Often those sources lead to legitimate offers available to work from home. Some of those offers may have already been pre-screened prior to the resource providing links to the opportunities. When you do find an opportunity that sounds like the one for you, and if you apply for the position you will most likely find yourself getting more support from your family if they know you did your research before applying for a work at home opportunity. A little bit of research goes a long way to avoid the work at home scams everywhere.

Doing some additional research in regards to other work at home and telecommuting tips can also lead you to some other avenues increasing your chances for succeeding at a work at home position. Who knows, you might even get lucky and land your dream career that you can work from home!

One such resource that has some great work at home articles to read is the CNN site. I didn't realize they had such a great work at home telecommuting section on their site until reading about it this evening in a forum I frequent. Good luck to you as you pursue your work at home dream career!

Budgeting for the Look for Less

Budgeting is something of a mystery to some people, but it really doesn't have to be that way. Retailers would love to convince us all that we need the newest fashion or garment, and that it needs to be a designer line -- all of which can blow a budget fast.

When I was growing up my parents were very frugal, and for good reason. Back then it was common that the father would be the one to bring in the income while the mother stayed home to raise the children. That required more creative juggling with the budget.

Being the youngest of two other sisters it was common for me to wear the hand-me-downs. In fact it was so common that by the time I became an adult it took me many years to buy anything brown to wear because it seemed most of my hand-me-downs were winter clothes in shades of brown. I got over that and eventually introduced brown into my wardrobe.

One thing I never did get over though was the fact that we often purchased our clothing in a second hand store. That budgeting technique has never left me, and if I don't shop at a second hand store first for some things I often feel guilty by not doing so. There are some exceptions though for health reasons, and one of which are shoes. I no longer purchase shoes at a second hand store.

If you're having difficultly with your budget, never underestimate the power of how much you can save by getting the same look for less when you find designer brands at a second hand store! I'm never embarrassed to share that I purchased items second hand, and in fact feel good about also helping the charities that survive off those revenues and donations.

In addition to purchasing garments second hand, I started collecting vintage costume jewelry in the mid 1980's, which has led to other vintage items thereafter. It's never too late to try a second hand store to help with the budget, or even if you are a collector. Here's another story about getting the look for less, which serves as a great reminder that a budget doesn't have to be boring!

This post was inspired by a Link & Blog Challenge!

Fairground Game Scams

With Summertime into full swing the fairgrounds are booming and raking in the money. Win or lose, fairground games are fun to play, but not for very long if you consistently lose. With each attempt to win, the only winner ends up being the merchant who suckered us into the fairground game, and on a rare occasion the player wins the prize, but often not until they've paid far more than what the so-called prize is worth.

A form of gambling, the fairground game scams are placing their bets that you can't succeed at the game to win the stuffed animal or other worthless prize, so they continue to come out ahead. Much like a casino slot machine working in the merchants favor, so is the strategy of the fairground games.

Bottle bowling is one example of fairground game scams, which only keep the ball rolling in the vendors favor. The next time you visit the fairgrounds, remember that it really isn't fair ground after all!

Work at Home Scam Statistics

Telecommuters are individuals that for whatever reason are rebelling against the rat race, and it's no surprise as family demands grow, and as traffic becomes unbearable in many geographical areas. As the Internet has become more powerful, more employers also have come to understand the benefits of hiring people to work from their homes.

In the pursuit to rebel against the rat race it is easy to fall prey to the many work at home scams throughout the Internet. If you're looking for a work at home position, you will be interested in learning this statistic. According to Rat Race Rebellion, they state;
For every 43 work at home leads researched, there is only 1 legitimate work at home opportunity!
That's an interesting statistic that every telecommuting wanna-be should know! The bottom line for avoiding work at home scams is to do your homework thoroughly. You must be willing to move forward with caution, and not allow your common sense and good judgment to be fooled by the scammers in order to determine what's a legitimate offer vs a scam.

When it comes to employment opportunities, there's always competition for the best positions. However, with a telecommuting position a person has to be prepared to not just be faced with competition, but also faced with the possibility of being a victim of a scam if the proper precautions are not taken.

If you've been led to believe that you can easily locate a telecommuting position, think again! It's obvious that one has much more research to complete, and a longer search ahead of them in order to find a legitimate work at home opportunity. If you're looking to find a work at home telecommuting position plan on investing a greater amount of time to land the perfect opportunity.

Life Insurance Policy Exclusions

Are you familiar with what your life insurance policy exclusions may be? Generally with life insurance the old saying, "You pay. You die. They pay." applies. However, with some types of coverage such as accidental death and dismemberment there are exclusions you would want to be aware of. In comparison to even inexpensive term life insurance, accidental death coverage is very cheap due to the exclusions in the accidental death contracts. Another concern is if you were to get killed by robots - lol.

With life insurance contracts in general you may also not be covered if you engage in dangerous sports or fly aircraft unless you have the proper riders or rating if death occurs from those events. Although it's not common, some contracts will not cover the death of the insured if death occurred from an act of war.

On a humorous note, you may also want to check your life insurance policy to see if you would be covered should death occur from robotic attacks! Watch this video to see an example -lol.

Happy 4th of July!




Piggybacking Credit To End

It isn't news to anyone that credit card lending has become quite a problem in every society. Many have obtained way too much debt by their over zealous use of credit cards, resulting in the inability for them to pay back the large amount of consumer debt they racked up. This contributes to the destruction of ones credit worthiness and has created the need for more people to take advantage of loopholes to boost their credit.

Back in December I wrote an article, "Should You Lend Your Good Credit?" in regards to the technique known as "piggybacking" and provided my two cents worth in regards to the loophole used by those needing to improve their credit. In my article about piggybacking I stated;
Essentially an individual who establishes good credit through the method of piggybacking has done so in a seemingly fraudulent manner. With the piggybacking credit method, it seems the mortgage industry is not only potentially defrauded by those who practice piggybacking, but also by the credit rating agencies who allow ones credit to be boosted by piggybacking strategies.
The problem I referred to above is exactly what has come to light for the lending industry, as they determined it poised a challenge for them to accurately determine ones credit worthiness if they had benefited from the piggybacking method to boost their credit scores. I also felt it was a bad opportunity for those wishing to sell their credit because it encouraged people to apply for even more credit cards to sell to piggybackers.

Now the lending industry has been enlightened to the problems it has presented them, as the volume of those utilizing the system increased due to the Internet. The opportunity for one to piggyback off another persons credit cards is coming to an end!

Overall, I feel this is a good decision for the lending industry, and allows them to return to rewarding those who truly deserve good lending rates, and not rewarding those who obtained a better score through a credit card and lending loophole. No more piggybacking credit!

This post was inspired by a Link & Blog Challenge!

Secure Your Product Data

Have you thought about writing an ebook or offering some other product on your website? There are many things to consider, but the one point you don't want to overlook is the security of your data and transferring the data to your clients in a secure manner.

If you're planning on storing sales products such as an ebook on your website to sell you may want to consider Secure Delivery Digital Download Manager. With Secure Delivery there is no bandwidth, product size, or sale limits and their service requires nothing to be installed on the users website.

Their product also offers PayPal and affiliate integration, tracking logs and notifications, plus their service is said to be easy to use, which sounds likely in that it is to take only 3 minutes to set it up. I haven't tried it because I'm not selling any type of data product online, but it sounds like an interesting service.

Although there is a monthly fee, there are no transaction fees per sale to deal with by utilizing their service, which is certainly a plus for anyone doing a large volume of sales.

Most importantly, the products are stored outside publicly accessible folders, which is certainly far more secure for your data. Their program also integrates with affiliate programs such as ClickBank. This may be something to keep in mind even if you don't currently sell data online, but may be in the future.

Research Assistant RA Scams

Those looking to find an online work at home employment opportunity are often targets of scams, which seem to come in a large variety. From the work at home scam variety pack I picked a great example to learn by, which is for a research assistant, aka an RA. To some the package at first appears legit because they have so much fluff in their document filled with lengthy verbiage.

However, looking at the research assistant or RA position closely it reveals its deception. The so-called research assistant or RA position professes to offer the ability to send you the merchandise for free in order for you to do a written review of the products, and then instructs you to sell them on Ebay or Amazon. It smells much like the re-packaging schemes going around in order to achieve money laundering or marketing of stolen goods.

Let's take a closer look at why this is a scam, and not an opportunity plus by all means it's far from being a job. Quoting from some of the information we'll take a look at the flaws and the gotcha's one-by-one to review the red flags.

They first lure the person in by promising them some great items, all of which they can then keep to sell on Ebay. But, the first red flag is they will take 30% of the profits for their "management fees". Their description of the opportunity is as follows:

You write a brief product description to go along with a small image. You keep all products we send you and sell them on Amazon or Ebay. You keep 70% of the profits. (30% of the profits paid to the company as management fees.)


Next red flag is the fact that they want you to buy a monthly program to commit to a website and of course pay some entity a monthly fee for it, which is probably tied in with their organization somehow:

The only money you have to spend as a new RA is the $7.95 per month for your (name changed) web page.


Moving onto the next red flag, in this example of their research assistant or RA program they encourage the person to select merchandise close to $500.00:

You should look for products costing between $100 - $500. Why this price range you ask? We have found through experience that this is the price range where you receive the most products to review.


As you know, a legitimate work at home opportunity or job is not going to ask you to pay them money. This is an obvious red flag:

This is what you pay us to be part of our review organization. We send you a paypal invoice once a week for your management fee on all books and products that were recently shipped to you.

You pay us a management fee of 30% on all products you receive from us and sell on Amazon or Ebay.


Their "management fee" is a red flag that they are potentially either marketing stolen merchandise, which you would be selling for them, or merchandise they purchased in order to work a money laundering ring. This has the same characteristics of the repackaging and money laundering scams where they have the participant take care of the marketing of their merchandise and take care of the handling of the funds received for the merchandise. Either way, it's a work at home scam you won't want to go near, unless you are hoping to have an FBI agent knocking on your front door.

Yet another twist to the research assistant program is the fact that they generally have a minimum production level in which they hold the participants to. The minimum production level in one research assistant or RA program I read about was 300 reviews a month. This is where the basic math of the entire equation then begins to reveal the fact that all they are attempting to do is to package a program to sell you merchandise. Then the person gets stuck being unable to market the goods on Ebay, yet the program will still bill them for the 30% management fees regardless.

Fair warning -- stay away from the research assistant or RA scams! Although this example discussed above may not be the same type of operation, it's very similar if not the same as a re-packaging money laundering scam. Last year the FBI caught up to one of those rings. From their website they stated; "This sentence is the result of an extensive investigation into a money laundering and conspiracy ring that involved stealing merchandise, re-labeling and reselling it, and then laundering the profits through various financial institutions. This criminal enterprise directly impacted business operations in states ranging from Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Kentucky, Florida, Texas, California and New York.” Lockhart said." The entire report from the FBI website can be found at their Cincinnati site.